Music and its Transformative Abilities by Maura Pierlot

#thetroubleintunetown #blogblast #booksontour #day10

Author Article by Maura Pierlot

Music Credit: Aidan Pierlot

Music and its Transformative Abilities

Maura’s passion for music and instruments is obviously evident in The Trouble in Tune Town. Here she describes her musical background, and what she believes to be the importance of musical experiences for young children. Thanks Maura! 🎸 🎺 🎹


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​I played guitar (classical and folk) but gave it up many years ago. Of course, I didn’t know at the time I was giving it up – I was just busy with study and work, and assumed I’d pick it up when the time came.

But life became even busier when uni finished and I decided to continue my studies, eventually completing my master’s and doctorate in philosophy (I first came to Australia to complete my PhD research, relocating here a few years later). Then came marriage and the challenges and demands of raising a young family while managing a few small businesses with my husband, Kieran.

Guitar playing should have been an enjoyable diversion – a stress reliever – but most days the instrument was out of sight, out of mind. I didn’t have a lot of ‘me’ time in those years, though I’m trying to make up for that a bit now ;-).

As for musical experiences, I think they’re essential for young and old alike. Whether it’s listening, learning or performing, I think music works a different side of our brains and maps neural connections that have follow-on benefits in other areas of our lives. On an emotional level, music has transformative abilities, often transporting us to a different time and place.

I think all children should be introduced to music early but as a communal activity, with a focus on everyone having fun, not in a competitive, ‘who has talent and should be extended’ kind of way; that can come later. I can certainly appreciate excellence, but I think there’s too much focus on that these days. Whether it’s in the classroom, or through sport/co-curricular, or in the workplace, it’s all about getting top marks, being a winner, having a point of difference. There’s very little attention paid to the notion of community, to the beauty and wonder of disparate voices and abilities coming together and, on an individual level, to overcoming obstacles and stepping outside your comfort zone, and striving to achieve your personal best.

I can say wholeheartedly that in all my years in business, I tended to hire the all-rounders, not the candidates with the best academic or employment credentials, preferring to focus instead on character traits. Of course, I wanted to hire people who were capable, but I also wanted to work with those who cared about the community they lived in, who would stop and help someone in need, who were loyal and trustworthy, who had a sense of humour, were inquisitive and wanted to learn. And in that sense, I think music, along with art, philosophy and languages, is essential, not only in school but in life.

#music #art #persistence #confidence


SING IT LOUD!  It’s G I V E A W A Y  T I M E!

WIN a hardback copy of the groovalicious picture book, The Trouble in Tune Town by Maura Pierlot and Sophie Norsa!

In 25 words or less, what instrument are you?

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The Trouble in Tune Town will be officially launched on Sunday May 6 at the National Library of Australia, Canberra from 2PM, in association with Music for Canberra. There will music, activities, book reading and signing. Click the image for details.




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2 thoughts on “Music and its Transformative Abilities by Maura Pierlot

  1. Renee Price says:

    Love this post, in particular, “There’s very little attention paid to the notion of community, to the beauty and wonder of disparate voices and abilities coming together and, on an individual level, to overcoming obstacles and stepping outside your comfort zone, and striving to achieve your personal best.”

    Thanks, Maura and JWFK!

    Renee

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